FAQ

At this point, you probably have a few questions regarding our products and services, and we’ve got answers.

When you are buying coconut milk

How is coconut milk fundamentally classified?

Generally, coconut milk is classified by its fat content. At MFP, we have 6 different classifications for our product standard;

Why is the range so wide as ±1%?

Our coconut milk is extracted from shredded mature coconut kernels, which are natural raw materials. The properties of these kernels vary among varieties, crops, places of growth, and seasons. Although we follow our recipe strictly, there will still be some variation between different batches because of varying raw material properties.

Do other packers also follow this 'classification'?

All packers have their own standards of classifying fat content. The “A” grade from one packer may not be the same as from another. Whereas the “B” grade from one factory can be better than the “A” grade from other packers. The best way to determine the quality of the products is to get some samples and send them to the lab for further quality check.

What can be added into the coconut milk?

All type of preservatives are strictly prohibited to be added into canned coconut milk. Some additives such as emulsifiers, stabilisers, and anti-browning agents are allowed to be added in the product at certain levels.

Our coconut milks are conformed to all additive regulations required by the USFDA.

How can we distinguish the 'Good' from the 'Bad'?

You should choose the coconut milk by the ‘look’ of the product, not 'what is written' on papers or e-mails. Most clients always look for the cheapest price on the quotation from suppliers, without ‘looking’ at the product quality.

Here are some our recommendations so as to examine the quality of the product without the actual test from the lab:

  • First, open the can and pour the sample into a bowl, without shaking the can. You should see the separation of coconut milk content into two layers of white creamy fat layer on top and water at bottom. This is very typical.

  • Stir the milk with a cleaned spoon. The content should start mixing together. It should look a lot smoother and more homogenised. At the lower room temperature, you may have to stir harder and longer to see the white and creamy homogenised coconut milk.

    **** The information contained in this publication is based on our own research and development work, and is to the best of our knowledge reliable. Anyone should, however, conduct his own tests to determine the suitability for his own specific purposes. Statements contained herein should NOT be considered as a warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, and no liability is accepted for the infringement of any patents.

Sulfur Dioxide(SO₂) and canned food products

Why most canned food products often get brown? 

All canned food products must be treated by the extreme heat to sterilise any remaining bacterial contamination as much as possible so as to ensure the shelf life of the product. However, at the same time, the heat will destroy the physical appearance of the product as well, causing some brownish colour to the product. In other word, the process of sterilisation burns the product out.

 

How to prevent it?

Sulfur Dioxide (SO₂) is mostly added into the product to prevent such browning reaction. The most common form of Sulfur Dioxide used in the local food industry is Sodium Metabisulfite (E223) (Na2S2O5) and Potassium Metabisulfite (E224) (K2S2O5).

Most people misunderstand them as a food preservative, however, these additives are not added to preserve food, but to prevent the brown colouring from burning process. USFDA approves the implication of Sodium Metabisulfite (E223) (Na2S2O5) in canned food products with a restriction of Sulfur Dioxide residue not to exceed 30 ppm.

For coconut milk, approximately 0.02% or 200 ppm of Sodium Metabisulfite (E223) (Na2S2O5) will be added at the beginning of the sterilisation. However, most of the added amount will deteriorate during the heating process. The remaining residue of Sulfur Dioxide in the product should be around 10 – 30 ppm. You may notice that the added amount at the beginning is not as 'serious' as the leftover amount at the end.

 

What if SO₂ is NOT added? 

The appearance of the finished product may not be so attractive as its colour will be more 'brownish' than usual. Sometimes, the brown colour effect can develop sooner or later, which may result the product shelf life to be shorter as well. In some countries such as Australia and New Zealand, Sulfur Dioxide is illegal and banned. Therefore, the colour of available products in the mentioned markets will be darker than of those from the rest of the world.

 

Dark chips in low SO₂ coconut milk 

Normally, there may be some protein skins or chips in the coconut milk which will react to the extreme heat in the same way as the top layer of soybean tofu. Hence, these protein skins may turn into some dark chips at the surface during heat treatment if the amount of added Sulfur Dioxide is very low. 

This phenomenon is very typical, especially in the rich coconut milk. However, these chips will break and disappear after the milk is cooked. 

 

How to put SO₂ on the label?

Since Sodium Metabisulfite (E223) (Na2S2O5) is strictly controlled by the legislation in many countries, the amount of Sulfur Dioxide residue is required to be declared clearly on the label. Up to 30-40 ppm of the Sulfur Dioxide residue is allowed  in the finished products and it can be classified as “low Sulfur Dioxide product”. Its name is NOT necessary to be written on the label.

**** The information contained in this publication is based on our own research and development work, and is to the best of our knowledge reliable. Anyone should, however, conduct his own tests to determine the suitability for his own specific purposes. Statements contained herein should NOT be considered as a warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, and no liability is accepted for the infringement of any patents.

How to choose the right coconut milk

The difference between commercial coconut milk and coconut extract

**** The information contained in this publication is based on our own research and development work, and is to the best of our knowledge reliable. Anyone should, however, conduct their own tests to determine the suitability for their own specific purposes. Statements contained herein should NOT be considered as a warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, and no liability is accepted for the infringement of any patents.

Western vs. Eastern

If you are new to buying coconut products, there is no need to worry!

At MFP, we categorise our products into two styles: the Western and the Eastern. The table below shows two examples to give you an idea of what kind of things you will be getting from us.

**** The information contained in this publication is based on our own research and development work, and is to the best of our knowledge reliable. Anyone should, however, conduct his own tests to determine the suitability for his own specific purposes. Statements contained herein should NOT be considered as a warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, and no liability is accepted for the infringement of any patents.

Sterile and Aseptic coconut milk

There are two different major categories of coconut milk processing: sterile and aseptic. 

The table below shows how those two types are typically operated in the commercial coconut industry. Once you finish studying the diagram, you will be ready to pick up the most suitable method of processing coconut milk according to your first inquiry.

**** The information contained in this publication is based on our own research and development work, and is to the best of our knowledge reliable. Anyone should, however, conduct their own tests to determine the suitability for their own specific purposes. Statements contained herein should NOT be considered as a warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, and no liability is accepted for the infringement of any patents.

How to choose the right packaging

Tin-plated can vs. Aluminium can vs. Quantum plastic bottle

 

**** The information contained in this publication is based on our own research and development work, and is to the best of our knowledge reliable. Anyone should, however, conduct his own tests to determine the suitability for his own specific purposes. Statements contained herein should NOT be considered as a warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, and no liability is accepted for the infringement of any patents.

Advantages and disadvantages Between Tetra-packed and Canned coconut milk

There are two different types of coconut milk packaging: tetra-packed and canned. 

The table below shows the differences between the two and how each would benefit you most according to your product inquiry. Once you finish studying the diagram, you will be ready to pick up the most suitable packaging for your coconut milk.

**** The information contained in this publication is based on our own research and development work, and is to the best of our knowledge reliable. Anyone should, however, conduct their own tests to determine the suitability for their own specific purposes. Statements contained herein should NOT be considered as a warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, and no liability is accepted for the infringement of any patents.

Important note on Litho-can

The lithographed can (litho-can) is basically a technique that imprints the graphic label directly onto the can surface. Although it certainly looks more attractive than the conventional label paper, the buyer should know about some other condition that will take place to pack a product in the litho-can. All the details are shown in the following tables:

 

Transportations and logistics

Choosing between 20-ft container and 40-ft container

In fact, many people often get confused by whether should the 40-ft container carry double quantity of the 20- ft container cargo. This is true if we talk about the volume-wise only, however, it would be a different story by the weight-wise.

The table below compares the differences between the two sizes: 20-ft container and 40-ft container. We hope that the diagram will at least give you a rough idea of how to choose the right one for your order transportation.

**** The information contained in this publication is based on our own research and development work, and is to the best of our knowledge reliable. Anyone should, however, conduct his own tests to determine the suitability for his own specific purposes. Statements contained herein should NOT be considered as a warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, and no liability is accepted for the infringement of any patents.

Transportation on a single-stacked pallet
  

At MFP, we only proceed with a single-stacked pallet loading to prevent any possible damages that may occur during the shipment. We currently use a plastic 4-way pallet, which is 100 cm wide and 120 cm long.

When loaded into a 20-ft FCL, there will be some space left between the top of pallets and the container ceiling. As for a 40-ft. FCL, the total gross weight of 20 pallets will be close to the load limit of the 40-ft FCL. In some cases, we may add some loose cases on top of pallets to reach the maximum gross weight limit. In most cases, we recommend to combine with multiple products to reach the maximum weight.

 

Figure 1: A single-stacked wooden pallet.

Transportation of 21.5-mt rectangular tin in 20-ft container

This transport information is based on the U.S. highway bi-axle or any highway elsewhere with truck load limit of 19.5 MT per 20’FCL.

Our rectangular tin is 24 cm x 24 cm x 34.5 cm in dimension, 19.5 kg gross weight with net content at 18.00 kg (40 lb).  The width and length of the pallet comply with the standard 4-way U.S.-pallet size (40” x 48”) or Euro-pallet size (100 cm x 120 cm).

 

Figure 1: Comparing the 15oz can (400 grams) and A-10 can (2840 grams) with the rectangular tin (40 Ib)

 

Figure 2: The pallet after stacking

Transportation of 27.5-mt rectangular tin in 40-ft container

This transport information is based on the U.S. highway bi-axle or any highway elsewhere with truck load limit of 27.5 MT per 40’FCL.

Our rectangular tin is 24 cm x 24 cm x 34.5 cm in dimension, 19.5 kg gross weight with net content at 18.00 kg (40 lb).  The width and length of the pallet comply with the standard 4-way U.S.-pallet size (40” x 48”) or Euro-pallet size (100 cm x 120 cm).

 

Figure 1: Comparing the 15oz can (400 grams) and A-10 can (2840 grams) with the rectangular tin (40 Ib)

 

Figure 2: The pallet after stacking